High Five! Comics

Superman v. The Great Depression

Posted on: August 8, 2010

“Fans come to me asking how this works or that works, and I say, ‘It’s a comic book. It’s not real.’ We already have a real world, why do you want fiction to be like that too?”
– Grant Morrison, 2010

An ad for Flash Comics

Lately I’ve been reading a lot of Golden Age comics. I know there aren’t many of my generation who appreciate this stuff, and I’m positive I don’t “get it” the way my grandparents did, but the mixture of innocence, desperation, and humanity I find in these old stories is quite compelling.

When my generation imagines old comics we think of Super Friends, but for all its glitter the times of the Golden Age were rather bleak. Thanks to Captain America and Wonder Woman we think the heroes of that first era were framed against the backdrop of WWII. This is not true. While it is true that Superman, Batman, and others came to stand for the American Way their personae were not forged in flames of war, but in the embers of Depression.

“We can do it!” Rosie the Riveter said that for the first time in 1942.  Superman debuted in 1938. We met Batman, Namor, and the Human Torch in 1939. Jay Garrick, Alan Scott, and the Spirit first appeared in 1940 alongside most of the Golden Age crew. Wonder Woman is the only major character to appear after Pearl Harbor, and she also joins Steve Rogers in color coordination. All of these heroes were born into an era scarred by record unemployment and rising crime as the country completed a full decade of economic depression.

People were starting to lose hope and this, my friends, is the world Superman needed to save.

Superman saves a woman framed for murder.

Something I love about the early days of superheroes is the lack of super-villains. Oh, sure there were a few notable bad guys like the Joker and Wotan, but on the whole super-villains were exceptions to the norm of mob bosses, corrupt officials, and street thugs. This is what I meant when I said the Golden Age comics were desperate. America thought the problems of everyday life were bad enough to need heroes.

This reveals a real sense of hopelessness deep in the psyche of that generation. Rampant unemployment. Gang violence on the rise and crime organizing like never before. Times were desperate, and the Common Man felt he was quickly losing his place in the day-to-day life of America.

See, creators like Rob Kanigher and Len Wein saw comics as fantastical tales to thrill an audience with absurdity and bizarre scenarios. Jerry Siegel, Bill Finger, C. C. Beck, and Mart Dellon saw comics as a cathartic escape from the harsh reality of violence, corruption, and black-mail.

They saw comics as a weird mixture of hope and escape.

Never mind the crude drawings and clumsy dialogue. The heroes idolized by my grandfather didn’t need to fight aliens to have meaning. Superman was great because he could stop a lynching. We believed in the Green Lantern because he could expose a mob-boss who had framed an innocent man. These heroes didn’t protect us from the unknown; what they brought was hope in the face of something very real and immediate. Put another way, the Golden Age offered escape from reality simply by solving the problems of poor Americans. I cannot imagine anything sadder or more exhilarating. So, while 1938-1950 may not have produced the best art or the most clever prose, America has arguably never seen comics that had more meaning. And that is enough to make a Golden Age.

-Jonny

[Subscribe to High Five! You know you wanna.]

Alan Scott dons his costume to protect innocents from loan sharks.

Advertisements

2 Responses to "Superman v. The Great Depression"

This is why something like JMS’ current Superman run is so needed. In a lot of ways, modern America is facing the same problems of Golden Age America. Watching superheroes save the world from meteors and aliens can only be impressive so many times, but watching folks with so much power, fictional though they may be, spend time helping folks with everyday problems doesn’t really stop being inspiring. As much fun as it is watching Batman take down his rogues gallery, reading a scene where he sets up a job for a young girl living on the streets and then makes sure she’s doing alright when he runs into her later, even as he’s just finished fighting for his life, hit me in a way comics do far too infrequently.

Very well written. Great points.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9 other followers

High Five! Twitter

  • Reading Card's "Homosexual 'Marriage' and Civilization." I wonder if he'd also be against the marriage of a Kryptonian and an Earthling. 4 years ago
  • I know Spidey & Doc Ock are stuck in the same body and all, but I wish the internet would stop calling them "Spock." THAT'S JUST CONFUSING. 4 years ago
  • Is there any place more appropriate to wear my Legion flight ring than at 30,000 feet? 5 years ago
  • R.I.P. Mr. Bradbury. If it weren't for you, I would have never gotten into science fiction at such an early age. 5 years ago
  • I'm sorry, DC, but giving the Phantom Stranger a definitive origin story in the DCnU is one of the stupidest things I've ever seen. 5 years ago
Add to Google <-Add Us!

Comic Blog Elite <-Read Them!

High Five! Comics at Blogged<-Rate Us!

High Five! Comics - Blogged

Check out the Top 50 Comics sites!

Le Counter

  • 152,894 people liked us, they REALLY liked us!
%d bloggers like this: